Research

Exclusive Research Briefs

 

Bâton Global regularly produces research briefs on core topics that will be covered throughout the year, as part of our annual B|G Research Project. These briefs are published as soon as they are finalised by our research team, allowing you to have access to the information in real time. In order to request access to the most recent research brief, please provide your name and email. A B|G representative will correspond within one business day for the information.

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Bâton Global creates value for our clients by providing conceptually and empirically based solutions to their most important problems. Our research investigates the multinational corporation (MNC) and how it can develop the organizational capabilities to be successful within a diversity of national, political, economic and socio-cultural environments.

Our research focuses on the intersection of international business, political economy and host-country institutions. This is a multidisciplinary space that requires theoretical, phenomenological, and methodological insight from a variety of core disciplines including economics, finance, sociology, anthropology, and political science. This is why consider ourselves members of the entrepreneurial community of international business scholar-practitioners.

We also focus on corporate sustainability as a systems level construct that recognizes the critical interdependency of organizational, economic, social, and political actors. Markets, states, and social actors all interact to define and implement their own vision of corporate sustainability, which may or may not be compatible. Therefore, our goal is to make a significant contribution to understanding the complex nature of a sustainable social contract between firms and the host-country environments in which they transact.

CITATION:

Mitchell, M., Rafi, M. I., Severe, S., Kappen, J. A. Conventional vs. Islamic Finance: The Impact of Ramadan Upon Sharia-Compliant Markets. Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies, 5(1).

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

The Islamic financial industry is growing at a rate 50% faster than that of conventional banking and is expected to be worth USD 2.1 trillion by the end of 2014. This rapid growth and institutionalization of an alternative financial market highlights a growing need to further investigate Sharia-compliant markets and how they compare with their conventional market counterparts. This paper investigates this broad relationship by focusing on the effects of Ramadan upon the performance of Sharia-compliant financial instruments. Specifically, we utilize an event-study methodology to compare the performance of Sharia-compliant stocks to their conventional counterparts across a large sample of countries and regions. We find strong evidence for a significant Ramadan effect within Muslim majority countries and regions. The effect is strongest in the days leading up to Ramadan, and also around the beginning of Ramadan’s third Ashra on the 20th day. This timing reflects the mental, emotional and practical preparations that individuals go through during the course of the month-long observance. These results are not consistent with traditional economic expectations and therefore reflect the unique socially-embedded nature of this emerging and religiously inspired financial system.

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CITATION:

Alon, I., Gurumoorthy, R., Mitchell, M., and Steen, T. 2006. Managing Micro-political Risk: A Cross Sector Examination. Thunderbird International Business Review, 48 (5): 623-642.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

This article stresses the need for today’s multinational firms to adopt their own political risk-assessment and risk-mitigation strategies. A comparative study of the energy, financial, and automobile sectors illustrates the need for all companies in these sectors to undertake comprehensive risk-assessment strategies. Risk-assessment models established by leading multinationals like British Petroleum, Bank of America, and General Motors are examined as examples that other companies in these sectors can build upon. The consistent micropolitical risk variables then lead to a pro- posed practical framework for examining sector-specific micropolitical risk.

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CITATION:

Mitchell, M., Alon, I., Herbert, T. 2011. Assessing & Managing Political Risk. In T. Wilkinson (Ed.), International Business in the 21st Century: Are You Ready? – Preparing for International Business Operations. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

Globalization and the ever-increasing flow of foreign direct investment worldwide have integrated the global marketplace. Multinational corporations (MNCs) around the world realize the importance of capturing an early market share, even in locales that may seem risky prospects. Risk-averse companies face the threat of losing lucrative future opportunities to more aggressive competitors.

Macro and micro political risks overlap, sharing some of the same determinants. Depending on the firm’s nationality, industry and particular situation, micro and macro risks can intersect to varying degrees. Academic research on micro political risk is still in its infancy. Contained in this narrative is a discussion of how the nature of political risk assessment has changed over the years and how leading firms in three economic sectors (energy, financial and auto) use their own political risk assessment to inform strategic decisions. Finally, a scoring model is presented that allows the analyst to develop comparative measures of different projects across multiple locations.

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CITATION:

Mitchell, M., Kappen, J. A., Hamad, M., 2014. An Expanding Dilemma: A Tough Choice Between Egypt and Venezuela (Revised and Updated). In I. Alon & E. Jaffe, Global Marketing 2e. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

This teaching case challenges students to fully analyze the political environments of two potential production facility locations in two volatile foreign markets with very different economic, social, and governmental. Students are presented with two market summaries and a political risk scorecard to aid in their decision-making and debate of their opinions.

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CITATION:

Mitchell, M. 2010. An Institutional Perspective of the MNC as a Social Change Agent: The Case of Environmentalism. Journal of Global Responsibility, 1(2): 382-398.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

Using an institutional theoryitutional environmen   First, I extend the existing model that describes the MNC as a social change agent within host country institutions.  This is accomplished by utilizing the country institutional profile (CIP) as a more formal conception of the host country institutional environment.  The model is then used to examine a specific case of the MNC impact on the host country level of environmentalism.

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CITATION:

Mitchell, M. 2012. Spirituality and Corporate Social Responsibility: Interpenetrating Worlds – Book Review. Journal of Management Spirituality and Religion, 9(2): 209-214.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

Corporate social responsibility and spirituality are both fields of study within the management literature that have finally reached a critical mass within the last decade. In his most recent collection of essays, editor David Bubna-Litic has produced a work that successfully introduces the broad range of themes that characterize these interconnected literatures. However it is the subtitle of “Interpenetrating Worlds” that most accurately conveys the full intention and contribution of his work. In different manners and degrees of success, the contributors collectively advocate for an increased interpenetration of the firm with the transcendent aspects of its social context.

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CITATION:

Alon, I., Mitchell, M., Munoz, J. M. 2010. Microfranchising in Less Developed Countries. In I. Alon (Ed.), Global Franchising. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

Microfranchising has matured from its beginnings in nonprofit development communities to capture the attention of the wider business community. Its successful proliferation in diverse emerging economies such as Kenya, El Salvador, and India has led to the establishment of profitable organizations, the creation of jobs, the alleviation of poverty, and sustainable economic development. We are aware of the great potential of this emerging business model, but are concerned about the paucity of academic literature on the subject. This article is an attempt to remedy this situation by synthesizing existing perspective and stimulating new avenues of research. Specifically, we explore viable models in the practice of microfranchising by revisiting literature pertaining to is precursor – franchising. Contemporary cases are also highlighted in order to identify effective and successful strategies.

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CITATION:

Mitchell, M., Vandegrift, D., 2014. Student Perceptions of Internationalization, Multiculturalism, and Diversity in the Business School. Journal of Teaching in International Business, 25(1): 25-43.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

Over the last five decades, business schools all over the world have adapted their strategies for introducing the theoretical and pedagogical consequences of globalization. Educational institutions have gone to great lengths to internationalize their curricula to stay current with the most recent trends in the globalizing economy. As this evolution takes place, the issues of multiculturalism and diversity are increasingly included in the internationalization dialogue. In this article we use qualitative focus groups to examine how U.S. business students experience the relationships among internationalization, multiculturalism, and diversity. Next, we consider the role of international business faculty in addressing this issue. We conclude by offering recommendations for successfully integrating these perspectives into a coherent curriculum.

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CITATION:

Miller, C. E., Mitchell, M. C., Kappen, J. A., & De Ocampo, M. B., 2014. Whither the Professor? Crafting a Viable Business Doctoral Program in a Developing Country. Journal of International Business Education, 9(1).

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:

Universities in many developing nations seek to enhance their business education programs to support their national economies. One problem often faced by such institutions is a shortage of fully trained doctoral faculty. This paper uses an institutional lens to identify and explore the material and non-material factors that have influenced the efforts of one private university in the Philippines to establish a doctoral program in business. Recommended strategies for addressing these challenges are provided.

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